Tag Archive: hacks


Get rid of those most annoying duplicate drives showing up in Windows 10’s Navigation Pane. Copy and Paste the code below to a REG file and run to remove. Might need to Re-run REG file after some major updates from Microsoft, usually less than 1-2 a year.

 

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Desktop\NameSpace\DelegateFolders\{F5FB2C77-0E2F-4A16-A381-3E560C68BC83}]

[-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Desktop\NameSpace\DelegateFolders\{F5FB2C77-0E2F-4A16-A381-3E560C68BC83}]

 

Often I will stroll into my office, drop my gear and power up my computer. Then I’ll buzz around taking care of the normal mundane stuff to start my day. I have Windows set to auto login my password secured main user account using netplwiz.exe which is kind enough to start all the processes that don’t start until a user is signed into the system. Gets my system all ready to go so when I sit down my system is as ready to get to work as I am. I also have my PC and HTPC setup to boot up after a power failure state to make sure my servers are running when the power returns. With the autologin in place it leaves my system open to mischievous co-workers to put pictures of grown men in diapers on my desktop. So I have an event setup in Task Scheduler that gets triggered when any user logs on C:\Windows\System32\rundll32.exe with the arguments user32.dll, LockWorkStation to lock my desktop immediately to keep my systems safe from outside influence. So I get the benefits of the auto logon, and the security of the password prompt to login.

So here’s the rub. Windows 10’s ( and apparently Windows 8 & 8.1, yuk) Lock Screen has a 1 minute timeout where if you don’t interact to the screen it powers off your display. I don’t know how much strain is put on my monitor powering up, then powering it back down, and then powering it backup if I bump something while sitting down, and then powering down a min later because I still haven’t logged in yet, and then powering back up when I finally log back in. On an almost daily basis, I just don’t think that can be good on the guts, and I can’t be plunking down $$$ on a whim for a new monitor. I want it to power up and stay up for a decent amount of time, and then if I still haven’t logged in yet, then go ahead and save the whales and power down.

Windows doesn’t by default give you a way to adjust the power down wait time at the lock screen. After digging around the net, I found a some gents had shared what I needed. You have to really dig down there into the guts of the registry to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerSettings\7516b95f-f776-4464-8c53-06167f40cc99\8EC4B3A5-6868-48c2-BE75-4F3044BE88A7

and set Attributes to a value of 2.

Add Option to Adjust Lock Screen Timeout In Power Settings

Once that’s set, open your Power Options, and under Display you should have a new power option ‘Console lock display off timeout’.
Lock Timeout

 

My H2100 headset just locked up on me for the first time. These are my daily drivers and I usually don’t like messing with stuff I need day in and day out if possible. Thankfully for me there is Youtube! Worked great! Few things to note:

  • The Ear muffs remove well by using the thumb from the inside gently lifting up out of the groove as the video shows. Be mindful of the thinner synthetic leather material as it seems to be the weakest point. Gently working around the unit works well and the material gives enough to get them on and off fairly easy but take your time to protect the materials life span.
  • I would recommend something along the lines of a thin guitar pick instead of the razor blade to remove the inner lining. Just have to get it started at one point, and then work your way around. It is held on with a tacky glue that once removed and the headphones are fixed, will aid well in making sure the lining will stay where it should just fine. My headset is about a year old and I would guess this glue should remain tacky for a few more years or so allowing for several more removals if needed. Once the glue is too old to be reused, I am sure I could clean the mounting surface easily and find a similar glue product to replace it with.
  • Really watch those cables when pulling the driver up. They are short and thin!
  • Also when pulling the 3 wire cable from the PCB inside to reset the device, pull on the plug, not the wires and ever so gently rock a bit to wiggle it free. A set of fine needle nose pliers or tweezers might be handy for bigger fingers.

Newegg.com – My favorite online retailer for Computer  Hardware. When my local shop can’t get it they are who I go to. Fast and great  prices. Great customer service.

Tweakguides.com – A collection of system & application tweaking guides. Lots of good stuff here.

Tech ARP  (Formally Adrian’s Rojak Pot) – Great comp. tech site. Have to check out their CPU, Video Card & other comparison charts.

Free BIOS Optimization Guide – Brought to you by TechARP a great guide covering almost every BIOS setting I’ve seen around with good descriptions and dismisses some of the myths and legends with facts.

Paul Thurrott’s SuperSite for Windows – Probably the best overall Windows site out there.

Old Version –  Find old versions of your favorite shareware. Because newer is not always  better.

Silent PC Review – Learn how to make your PC or HTPC as quite as possible. Remember no CAPS (shouting) allowed.

Startech – Startech has hard to find custom tech tools and equipment. From cables, switches & adaptors to testing and creation tools.

TinyUrl – Make super long url’s into small simple urls.

Jinx – Clothing for gamers & geeks.

Think Geek – Stuff for gamers & geeks.

Windows Sysinternal – Great system apps created by Mark Russinovich and Bryce Cogswell recently bought by Microsoft

Twit Netcast Network – Great group of tech netcast staring Leo Laporte, Patrick Norton, Kevin Rose, John C. Dvorak and other tech bigleaguers.

MonoPrice.com – Cheap, High Quality Audio, Video, Tech cables & converters, and many hard to find specialty items.

Interfacelift – Fantastic desktop wallpapers.

http://www.videohelp.com – All around computer audio / video guides, apps and methods.

http://www.doom9.net – DVD backups & other encoding

If you are on a domain that has your Documents folder being re-directed to the server, you can do the following to disable the documents folder redirection so you can path it to where you like, like on a local secondary hard drive or to another network location. Warning! The following will permanently disable your systems ability to auto redirect your documents folder using the servers profile settings. You will have to manually change the documents path if you want your documents folder to be re-directed back to the server. This may also be against your networks policies & it involves registry editing so continue at your own risk!

1. O.k., First off login to your domain account. Next, locate C:\Windows\System32\fde.dll and C:\Windows\System32\fdeploy.dll. Open each file in a simple text editor like notepad and erase the contents of the files and save them as empty files.

2. Start Regedit & do a search for fde.dll & fdeploy.dll and delete the keys (folders on the left side of the Registry window). There should be about 3-5 for each one depending on your systems setup.

3. Next locate HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer\ and delete the string DisblePersonalDirChange.

4. Close Regedit, open the Task Manager, and end task on each explorer.exe process, until the start bar disappears(shell). Now in the Task Manager, choose File, New Task (Run…) and in the dialog box the opens type explorer and click O.K.

5. Now right click on your My Documents folder, properties, and write down the current target path. You will need this to redirect your documents back to the server later if you choose. You can now click Move and select a location on your system for your documents folder. The default windows setting usually will be something like C:\Documents and Settings\Username\My Documents for Windows XP or C:\Users\Username on Windows Vista/7. You will be prompted to move your documents to the new location. I usually say no, do step 6, make sure everything is working good and then manually move my files.

6. Reboot your system and check to see make sure your documents folder still points to your selected path and has not been reset by the server. If everything looks good you can move your files to their new home from the the old location on the server to their new home in your selected path.


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